Sanders Properties Inc | Tuxedo Park, Grand View-ON-Hudson, South Nyack Real Estate


Any pet owner will tell you that their pets are a part of the family. They bring joy to new families getting their first dog, and companionship to people who would otherwise live alone. However, they also bring the pet odors associated with having them around the house.

Since we spend so much time in our own homes, we oftentimes don’t even notice pet odors. So, even if you think your home is free of odors, it’s a good idea to get an unbiased opinion of the various odors of your home so that you can address them if necessary.

In this article, we’re going to teach you how to identify and neutralize those pet odors before the open house or first home showing. That way you can make the best impression on potential sellers and leave them feeling like your home has been well-maintained.

Identifying pet odors in your home

Whether you’ve got a dog, cat, rabbit, or hamster, odds are your little friend puts off some amount of odor. To discover where, if any, odors can be found, invite a friend over to your home who isn’t familiar with the smells and ask them their honest opinions about the various rooms in your home. This will give you a good idea of where you need to focus your efforts.

Important areas to clean

First thing’s first: the fabrics, surfaces, furniture, and carpet in your home in your home hold onto odor the most. Renting or buying a carpet cleaner, mopping the hard surfaces, and washing or refreshing curtains is a great place to start.

Many steam cleaners can be used on various surfaces, making them a good solution to get the most value out of your cleaning budget.

Don’t forget the carpet pad

If your pets have ever had “accidents” on your carpets, it’s vital to remember that their mess likely soaked through the carpet onto the carpet pad. While it may seem like a lot of effort to pull up the carpet just to clean the pad, it may be your only option in severe cases of pet odors.  

Painting

Repainting is a guaranteed way to remove any lingering odors in your home. Try to time your painting so that the room has the chance to air out and the smell of fresh paint isn’t overpowering.

Repainting is also the perfect opportunity to brighten up the rooms of your home, making them feel more spacious. Sticking to neutral, proven colors will give you the most bang for your buck.

Let some fresh air in

Before showing your home, open up the doors and windows and doors to closets and basements and let a draft run through the house. This can eliminate any musty smells that have accumulated in the lesser used parts of your home, as well as help mitigate the effect of pet odor.

Last minute additions

The day of showing your home, use a high-quality scented candle or two in places that your pets frequent. You don’t want it to be obvious that you’re trying to mask any bad odors, so don’t use anything overpowering. Rather, opt for a pleasant-to-neutral fragrance that isn’t too noticeable.


Many new homeowners see getting a dog as a rite of passage to homeownership. Oftentimes, they’re moving from apartment buildings that didn’t allow dogs or parents who didn’t want pets and having their own home finally seems like their chance at having a dog. However, it’s important to take into consideration several factors before buying or adopting a dog.

In this article, we’ll talk about what it means to be both a dog owner and a homeowner, and discuss how to tell if buying a dog is a good move for you in your new home.

Time management

It has been said that having a dog is like having a two-year-old child who stays that difficult age for ten years. Depending on the dog’s breed, temperament, and trainability, there’s a chance you could be in for a handful of a dog.

The first factor in deciding whether or not to get a dog in your new home is to determine if you have the time to take care of it. If you work long hours or have to travel for work, these are obvious signals that you might not have time to spend with a pet who needs care and attention.

However, you should also consider whether you have an extra hour each morning and evening to feed and play with your dog who will need exercise to stay healthy. You’ll also need to set aside time each week for things like training, socializing, bathing, trimming their nails, and so on.

All of these commitments add up, so it’s important to consider how much time you have before going down to the shelter to or kennel to pick up a new dog.

Dogs are expensive

Most people who don’t own a dog do not realize how expensive they are. Food is just the tip of the iceberg, and if you’re planning on getting a large dog, food can cost you well over $100 each month. On top of food, you’ll need to be prepared to spend up to $200 for each visit to the vet and for necessary medications for things like heartworm, fleas, and ticks.

Dog training is also highly recommended to ensure that you and your dog both have a better understanding of what’s expected of one another. Training will help with things like obedience, but also will improve your dog’s behavior by giving them a job to focus their energy on (rather than on tearing up your furniture).

Dogs need space

It may seem like you have all the space in the world in your new home, especially if you moved from a small apartment. However, many dog breeds require room to run freely. If you want to get a sporting dog, you’ll either need to take them somewhere they can run each day, or have a yard large enough for them to run in.

If you choose the latter, you’ll need to make sure your dog is safe from traffic if you live on a busy street. That could mean spending hundreds of dollars to erect a fence.

Ultimately, having a dog can be a highly rewarding experience for you and your pet. But now that you know some of the fine print to dog ownership, you’ll be able to make a more informed decision on whether or not getting a dog is right for you.